Media

Fish from the high seas are too valuable to be eaten, as they lessen climate change through the carbon they carry down to the ocean depths. The carbon benefits are worth $150 billion every year – almost ten times the value of high seas fish landings. Life in the deep seas absorbs 1.5 billion tonnes […] Read More >

An international panel of former heads of state, government ministers and prominent business leaders is calling for world leaders to protect the ocean by adopting a sweeping five-year “rescue package.” The report released Tuesday by the Global Ocean Commission recommends that the United Nations and national governments restrict fishing in international waters, eliminate fishing subsidies, […] Read More >

Fish and aquatic life living in the high seas are more valuable as a carbon sink than as food and should be better protected, according to research from the University of British Columbia. The study found fish and aquatic life remove 1.5 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere every year, a service valued […] Read More >

Marine life in the high seas soak up an amount of carbon equivalent to 30 percent of the US’s annual emissions. This carbon-sequestering service is worth about $148 billion a year, according a new study from the Global Ocean Commission At the same time, increased fishing activity threatens the whole process, according to the researchers. […] Read More >

Fish and aquatic life living in the high seas are more valuable as a carbon sink than as food and should be better protected, according to research from the University of British Columbia. The study found fish and aquatic life remove 1.5 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere every year, a service valued […] Read More >

Next time you eat fish for dinner, consider that your meal is probably worth more money as a carbon capture and storage device. By assigning a dollar value to carbon stored in ocean ecosystems, two recent scientific reports are attempting to make nations reconsider the true worth of their fishing activities. The first, a new […] Read More >

Re-posted from UBC News: Twenty-five years ago on this day, a supertanker carrying over 200 million litres of crude oil ran aground in Prince William Sound, Alaska, resulting in one of the most publicized environmental tragedies in history. Within five hours of the incident, over 40 million litres of oil had spilled from the ruptured […] Read More >

With the federal government expected to announce its decision on the Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipeline in June, economic and environmental experts are warning the public of the potential pitfalls that could come with it, even comparing it to the Exxon Valdez disaster of 1989. UBC fisheries economist Ngaio Hotte has ran the numbers looking […] Read More >

At first glance, the National Energy Board’s thoroughness of the review the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project might seem comforting, but with conditional approval of the project, British Columbians have serious reason to be concerned — particularly as Kinder Morgan has now also submitted its application to expand the capacity of the Trans Mountain Pipeline. […] Read More >

Canada, a country founded on its natural resources, possesses more natural wealth, per capita, than any other any other nation in the world. Our natural resources sustained our First Nations and catalyzed settlement, from east to west. While Canada has changed considerably since its early days, natural resources still drive our economy. Yet, some suggest […] Read More >